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According to a report from CNBC, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos is “obsessed” with the high number of musculoskeletal injuries occurring among the company’s warehouse workers. On April 15th, 2021, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos published the company’s 2020 Letter to Shareholders, which noted that “about 40% of work-related injuries at Amazon” are musculoskeletal disorders. Here, our New Jersey workers’ compensation attorneys discuss why these types of injuries are so common and explain what you should do if you suffer a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) at work.

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Universal Citation: NJ Rev Stat § 38A:13-1 (2019)

38A:13-1. Medical care and compensation

A member of the organized militia who incurs an injury, disease or disability in the line of duty, and whose claim is approved by the Adjutant General, or his duly appointed representative shall be entitled to the same benefits as are provided in article 2 of chapter 15 of Title 34. If the member incurs death under the same conditions, the dependent members of the family of the deceased, if any, shall be entitled to compensation as provided in article 2 of chapter 15 of Title 34. To the extent that a member or dependent may be entitled to receive federal benefits for particular elements of a claim, the benefits provided pursuant to this section shall be reduced by the amount of the federal benefits paid for each element of a claim.

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Amazon workers are essential, delivering the goods and products that consumers need and want, especially during a global pandemic when in-person shopping may be dangerous. But working for Amazon, whether as a warehouse worker or a driver, is not necessarily safe. In fact, Amazon fulfillment centers have been deemed more dangerous than other warehouse types. Because of the high risk to workers, the state of Washington has decided to boost the workers’ compensation premium rate for Amazon fulfillment center employees. Here is what you should know:

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